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Disruption increases demand for executive coaching

According to our lead article in this week’s Sheridan Weekly, the first lesson of leadership is: “What got you promoted won’t help you now”. Add in the disruptive power of technology, stoking the fastest-ever pace of business change and the inadequacy of yesterday’s successes becomes very clear.

Employees are also stepping up to leadership roles at much earlier stages in their careers. They’re under pressure to simultaneously drive strategy, perform functional responsibilities, and develop their personal leadership style. These new leaders are crying out for executive coaching, both individually and in the way they work with others in the executive team.

The latter is why, here at Sheridan Resolutions, we’re very excited about our forthcoming 2019 Breakfast Summit Series aimed at HR thought leaders and senior business decision-makers. The first of these, later this month, will deal with Team Coaching, particularly focusing on helping senior teams to work more effectively together.

The key speaker at that event will be Ty Francis, an expert on the concept of systemic team coaching. We want you to have a clear set of practical ideas as to next steps. So for each event in the Sheridan Resolutions Breakfast Summit Series we will also produce a Thought Leadership Paper to help reinforce key learnings, as well as using it to stimulate wider discussion on each topic.

Keep looking at our blogsLinkedIn and twitter for more details. And don’t forget to Sign up Here  for the Sheridan Weekly. It’s free and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Caroline Sheridan, Chair, Workplace and Employment CMC group and Founder of Sheridan Resolutions

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The growing power of team coaching

At Sheridan Resolutions, we’re very excited about our forthcoming 2019 Breakfast Summit Series aimed at HR thought leaders and senior business decision-makers. The first of these, later this month, will deal with Team Coaching, particularly focusing on helping senior teams to work more effectively together. The key speaker at that event will be Ty Francis, an expert on the concept of systemic team coaching.

Team coaching is so important – it involves a single coach working with a group of managers or executives. This gives members of the group the opportunity to stretch beyond their current abilities. And by partnering with the team in the context of its everyday work challenges, the coach can introduce new ideas and see opportunities to improve team performance as a whole. One aspect of this, better collaboration, is featured in today’s Sheridan Weekly.

Team coaching is on the increase. It can be confused with team facilitation, offsite away-days, etc. We want you to have a clear set of practical ideas as to next steps. So for each event in the Sheridan Resolutions Breakfast Summit Series we will also produce a Thought Leadership Paper to help reinforce key learnings, as well as using it to stimulate wider discussion on each topic.

Keep looking at our blogs, LinkedIn and twitter for more details. And don’t forget to Sign up Here  for the Sheridan Weekly. It’s free and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Caroline Sheridan, Chair, Workplace and Employment CMC group and Founder of Sheridan Resolutions

 

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The case for strong professional relationships

Companies that enjoy a high-performance workplace, we have found at Sheridan Resolutions, have something in common: a culture that encourages inclusion, collaboration and teamwork.

Recent articles in the Sheridan Weekly and iremind me that it’s difficult to foster this culture unless professional relationships are strong and respectful, with a pro-active approach to mediation whenever conflict arises. Disagreements between employees can seem like a little local difficulty, but unless tackled quickly, can spread to have a negative impact on corporate culture and, ultimately, the employer brand. To have even two employees in conflict can become problematic for an entire organisation.

If your organisation has the aspiration to be the best, or at least as good as it can be, then remember this: what’s important is not just bringing in mediation to tackle conflict when the damage is already done. It is in fostering a culture to strengthen professional and respectful relationships to minimise conflict – and acting quickly to settle a dispute if it arises.

Don’t forget to Sign up Here  for the Sheridan Weekly. It’s free and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Caroline Sheridan, Chair, Workplace and Employment CMC group and Founder of Sheridan Resolutions

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A Confidence Boost for Female Leaders

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There are some excellent articles on women in leadership in this week’s Sheridan Weekly. One feature looks at how women in senior positions can profoundly change a company’s culture, while another looks frankly at the reluctance some men feel around mentoring aspiring female leaders. Both pieces are well worth a read.

As someone who has worked in the City for many years, I am acutely aware of some of the difficulties women face in getting into and thriving in senior roles there, as elsewhere. Whilst there has been a marked improvement in the past few years, corporate life is still a challenging environment.

Women hold less than a quarter of FTSE 100 directorships. At Sheridan Resolutions, we support women to think about their style, approach and confidence in the workplace and provide insight and guidance on how to best get to where they want to be. Sometimes the need is for one-to-one coaching or mentoring to focus on specific needs and to gain insight as to how best to interact with colleagues and behavioural styles to address.

This gives them the confidence they need to approach their careers from a new angle, with a momentum that can carry them further within a company than they may have previously thought possible.

Don’t forget to Sign up Here  for the Sheridan Weekly. It’s free and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Caroline Sheridan, Chair, Workplace and Employment CMC group and Founder of Sheridan Resolutions

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Reinforce humanity during times of change

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There is a strong theme of the “digital workplace” emerging. We hear great stories on how the world of work is being shaped by the power of technology. Change is going on all around us and somehow, amid the upheaval, we need to make sense of it all.

Here at Sheridan Resolutions we see that the key to helping business leaders realise their full potential is to strengthen professional relationships and create high-performing workplaces. To do this, any focus on leadership development, team performance, executive coaching and mediation services has to focus more resolutely than ever, even in the face of sweeping digital changes, on maintaining and improving the fabric of workplace relationships.

This is increasingly difficult in the face of massive disruption. Business today relies increasingly on innovation as the bedrock of its success and many organisations are not prepared when faced with the disruptive innovation of others. As a result, more businesses are taking proactive steps not just to survive, but to thrive from disruption to their established methods and markets.

Even in the face of big changes, it’s important for us to cling to one constant – that it’s still possible for leaders to flourish through their humanity.

Don’t forget to Sign up Here  for the Sheridan Weekly. It’s free and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Caroline Sheridan, Chair, Workplace and Employment CMC group and Founder of Sheridan Resolutions

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Taking team or group decisions, by David Clutterbuck

The Abilene effect (where a solution is adopted that no-one really favours, but no-one feels sufficiently opposed to, to go against the majority) happens remarkably frequently, even in high performing teams. It is actually quite easy to prevent, with the use of a simple procedure.

The starting point is to discuss the question: “What are we trying to achieve with this decision?” Or, to put it another way, “How does this decision align with our collective purpose?”

The second step is the question: “What are the key criteria we should apply to this decision?” There may be some disagreement, but it is normally possible to identify a small number of factors that everyone agrees are important. Issues that are important only to a few people are captured as a separate list.

The third step is to define clearly the alternative ways forward. If there are no alternatives, this may be a sign that the issue has not been given enough consideration. On average, a decision based on two or more alternatives is more than half again as likely to be seen positively in retrospect, than one without any alternatives.

Now, taking each alternative in turn, everyone scores the items on these two lists, using the same scale, in answer to the question: “To what extent would this solution meet each of these criteria?”

Sharing the scores gives a reasonably accurate picture of the spread of opinion and why people are minded more towards one solution than another. It also increases the chances that potential downsides of each of the alternatives are brought into the open and discussed, so that the team can install appropriate contingency measures. And it makes sure that minority views and information held by only a few members are acknowledged and taken into account.

It may sound time consuming – and it is. But even more time consuming is unravelling poor decisions. In deciding whether to use this approach on a decision, therefore, one further question is helpful: “What is the potential cost (in times of money, time, energy and so on) of getting this wrong?”

Lastly, the backstop question: “How confident are we that this is a good decision?” If team members are unsure, but still trying to maintain a sense of unity, an honest response here will enable the team to dig more deeply until there is genuine agreement.

Those six key questions again:

  • What is the potential cost (in times of money, time, energy and so on) of getting this wrong?
  • What are we trying to achieve with this decision?
  • What are the key criteria we should apply?
  • What alternatives are we looking at?
  • To what extent does each solution meet the criteria?
  • How confident are we that this is a good decision?

 

Professor David Clutterbuck

Coaching and Mentoring International

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Sheridan Resolutions wins London Market HR and L&D Supplier of the Year

We are thrilled to bits…! Sheridan Resolutions won London Market H R & L&D Supplier of the Year at the Market People Awards 2018 earlier this month.

We are so proud of our team.. they are all so amazing. Thanks to all our clients and those who nominated and voted for us.

To make a great night perfect, I was also proud to present the outstanding contribution to HR and Leadership Development to my great friend, Eric Linin. Well done Eric – so richly deserved!

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Sheridan Resolutions wins major award!!

We’re delighted to announce that Sheridan Resolutions has won the HR & L&D Supplier of the Year Award for the London insurance sector’s Market People Awards. Caroline Sheridan, Founder of Sheridan Resolutions says: “I am thrilled to bits…! We pride ourselves on delivering outstanding results every time and we’re delighted that this has been recognised! Thanks to all our clients and those who nominated and voted for us.”

 

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How to make global teams work effectively

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How can we make global teams work more effectively? The further apart we are, the closer we need to be – and feel. Remote leaders and disparate teams, once unusual, are now commonplace. The international perspective of even smaller businesses, allied with new technologies, has made it necessary to work collaboratively across distributed teams.

However, too many organisations focus their efforts on the processes of making global teams work, but take for granted the management practices required for success. It’s important to put extra effort toward managing what remains an essentially human challenge. A move towards team-based leadership, particularly when teams are distributed, usually requires a careful and clear focus on coaching new leadership styles.

Distributed team members need to have sharp antennae around how and when to relinquish control and, in so doing, show extra respect for the differing perspectives and approaches of those who work for them. This helps to keep all members of the team motivated.

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Caroline Sheridan, Chair, Workplace and Employment CMC group and Founder of Sheridan Resolutions.

Email caroline@sheridanresolutions.com

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