Archive for Executive Coaching

New Sheridan Whitepaper on Coaching through Change!

New Sheridan Whitepaper on Coaching through Change!

We recently held the latest event in our Sheridan Breakfast Series, “Coaching through Change”. The findings of this breakfast are shared here. We also wanted to share some of our own work in this area for a growing number of international clients. And we were especially keen to listen closely to the experiences of breakfast guests using executive coaches during times of change.

Executive coaching brings improved levels of performance to existing and future roles. It accelerates high potential; manages stress, change, conflict or crisis; and acts as a confidential sounding board for sensitive and strategic management issues. In a world full of change, we are not always able to make time to stand back, reflect and see the bigger picture and yet the faster things change, the more people need to take time to reflect. Coaching through change gives an organisation the space to do this and ensures that important decisions and actions are considered. And this in turn means that outcomes are more likely to be positive for all. The personal dimension is everywhere during times of change. Many of us know of someone who had a lot of success and then hit a wall when circumstances changed. They need the time and space to refocus on what they need to do next and how to absorb new realities

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Coaching through Change – Our latest Sheridan Breakfast

Our latest event this week was all about “Coaching through Change” held at the offices of our friends at Liberty Group. In an excellent session, we looked at our own experiences of Coaching through Change in a variety of case studies and got excellent feedback from attendees on the Top Tips for best outcomes from coaching interventions.

It’s so important to hold these breakfasts. In today’s fast-moving and changing world, we are not always able to make time to stand back, reflect and see the bigger picture – and yet everything we do starts with thinking. Executive coaching enables self-reflection and therefore ensures decisions and actions are considered. This in turn means that outcomes are positive for both coaches and sponsor organisation. It brings improved levels of performance to existing and future roles; accelerates high potential; manages stress, change, conflict or crisis; and acts as a confidential sounding board for sensitive and strategic management issues.

We will share the results of the breakfast in a forthcoming whitepaper and podcast.

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New Sheridan Whitepaper on Team Coaching!

New Sheridan Whitepaper on Team Coaching!

We’re delighted to showcase our whitepaper on Team Coaching. Team coaching is moving rapidly up the agenda of businesses we work with. The International Coach Federation (ICF) has identified it as the single biggest area of coaching growth over the last decade.

It fits in with our values at Sheridan Resolutions. We often talk about reasserting humanity in an era of disruption. To do this in the workplace in practice means that businesses must find and embed better ways for individuals to work positively and more effectively with one another within their own teams – and for those teams to work more effectively with other teams.

Key issues addressed in this whitepaper on team coaching include the impact on performance, on leadership and on how teams collaborate both internally and externally. And it’s important as well to remember that a great executive coach is not necessarily the same thing as a great team coach – we help readers understand what separates the best from the rest.

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Team Coaching Podcast – have a listen!

Welcome to our very first Sheridan Resolutions podcast! We’ve picked Team Coaching as our first subject … read here what it’s about and have a listen to the audio at the bottom of this article …

Team coaching is emerging as a major area of interest for organisations everywhere. The International Coach Federation (ICF) has identified it as the single biggest area of coaching growth over the last decade – and it is not hard to see why.

At Sheridan Resolutions, we often talk about reasserting humanity in an era of disruption. To do this in the workplace in practice means that businesses must find and embed better ways for individuals to work positively and more effectively with one another within their own teams – and for those teams to work more effectively with other teams.

This is easier said than done. Teams are changing and the coaching response needs to change too. This means understanding what we mean by “team coaching”, as distinct from other terms, such as team building, team development and others. It also means identifying the common factors underlying successful team coaching, all of which we have looked at in this podcast.

There are many scenarios in which team coaching be used, such as coaching existing teams, new teams, teams facing new challenges or teams taking time out to reflect. In addition, systemic team coaching – which looks at the connections between teams – is growing rapidly in importance for many businesses.

Key considerations addressed in this podcast on team coaching include the impact on performance, on leadership and on how teams collaborate both internally and externally. And it’s important as well to remember that a great executive coach is not necessarily the same thing as a great team coach – this podcast seeks to help listeners understand what separates the best from the rest.

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The hidden benefit of executive coaching

Our lead article in this week’s Sheridan Weekly reveals a hidden benefit of executive coaching. The growth of the executive coaching industry has been well documented in recent years. But there is one key asset that is frequently overlooked – the potential to unlock talent and capability.

Executive coaching necessitates a change in leadership style – managers don’t have the specific answers, so they no longer need to waste time pretending that they do. Instead, they should move to a position of enabling learning and creating knowledge within their teams. Everyone needs to be learning constantly, including managers, and increasingly their purpose is to create the conditions that make it as easy as possible for others to do the same.

At Sheridan Resolutions we know that to develop a coaching culture requires an understanding of this learning mentality – and its individuality, because everyone has their own learning style. As the business coaching pioneer Sir John Whitmore once noted:  “No two human minds or bodies are the same. How can I tell you how to use yours? Only you can discover how, with awareness.”

Coaching is there to fill that gap and unlock the potential in each individual, yet only around one-third of organisations make use of it in developing people for executive roles. Most continue instead to rely upon customised training and developmental job assignments as the foundation of their leadership development approach. Yet executive coaching can be far more effective as part of an overall learning strategy rather than a standalone.

Keep looking at our blogsLinkedIn and twitter for more details. And don’t forget to Sign up Here  for the Sheridan Weekly. It’s free and you can unsubscribe at any time.


Caroline Sheridan, Chair, Workplace and Employment CMC group and Founder of Sheridan Resolutions

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Executive coaching: The importance of trust

There’s a really good lead article in this week’s Sheridan Weekly around that vital ingredient of executive coaching – trust. In the absence of trust, it says, executives tend to be defensive rather than candid, making it hard to identify the core drivers that underlie their performance. Without trust, it’s also difficult for the person to take the “leap of faith” necessary for considering alternative ways of thinking or experimenting with new behaviours.

Leaders face a difficult and growing challenge: they need to give leadership to those who know far more about a particular business process or specialism than they do. This necessitates a change in leadership style – managers don’t have the specific answers, so they no longer need to waste time pretending that they do. Instead, they should move to a position of enabling learning and creating knowledge within their teams. Everyone needs to be learning constantly, including managers, and increasingly their purpose is to create the conditions that make it as easy as possible for others to do the same.

To develop a trusting executive coaching culture in this new environment isn’t easy. It requires an understanding of this learning mentality – and its individuality, because everyone has their own learning style. Executive coaching is there to unlock the potential in each individual and trust lies at the heart of its success or otherwise.

Keep looking at our blogsLinkedIn and twitter. And don’t forget to Sign up Here  for the Sheridan Weekly. It’s free and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Caroline Sheridan, Chair, Workplace and Employment CMC group and Founder of Sheridan Resolutions

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Disruption increases demand for executive coaching

According to our lead article in this week’s Sheridan Weekly, the first lesson of leadership is: “What got you promoted won’t help you now”. Add in the disruptive power of technology, stoking the fastest-ever pace of business change and the inadequacy of yesterday’s successes becomes very clear.

Employees are also stepping up to leadership roles at much earlier stages in their careers. They’re under pressure to simultaneously drive strategy, perform functional responsibilities, and develop their personal leadership style. These new leaders are crying out for executive coaching, both individually and in the way they work with others in the executive team.

The latter is why, here at Sheridan Resolutions, we’re very excited about our forthcoming 2019 Breakfast Summit Series aimed at HR thought leaders and senior business decision-makers. The first of these, later this month, will deal with Team Coaching, particularly focusing on helping senior teams to work more effectively together.

The key speaker at that event will be Ty Francis, an expert on the concept of systemic team coaching. We want you to have a clear set of practical ideas as to next steps. So for each event in the Sheridan Resolutions Breakfast Summit Series we will also produce a Thought Leadership Paper to help reinforce key learnings, as well as using it to stimulate wider discussion on each topic.

Keep looking at our blogsLinkedIn and twitter for more details. And don’t forget to Sign up Here  for the Sheridan Weekly. It’s free and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Caroline Sheridan, Chair, Workplace and Employment CMC group and Founder of Sheridan Resolutions

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Executive coaching key to creating a learning culture

As a company grows, the personality and idiosyncrasies of its leader sets the tone for the entire workplace culture. Very few leaders come to the table with the full set of skills they need to build their companies – and the way they think and act can affect everyone around them.

Those who understand the challenges associated with building and scaling a successful company can attest to the benefits of executive coaching. By encouraging leaders with whom we work to get into the habit of being coached, we set in place the start of a learning culture for all.

For many, this requires a change in leadership style, as the leader moves from a position of dominance to one of enabling learning and creating knowledge within their teams. And leaders needs to be learning constantly themselves – just like anyone else – and that makes it as easy as possible for others to do the same.

To develop a coaching culture requires an understanding that everyone has their own learning style. A skilled executive coach knows that no two people think the same. So a prescriptive approach can never work – only the learner can discover how, via their own growing self-awareness, they can move forward.

Coaching is therefore there to fill the gap and unlock the potential in each individual. At present, however, only around one-third of organisations make use of it in developing people for executive roles.

Most continue instead to rely upon customised training and developmental job assignments as the foundation of their leadership development approach. This is a shame, as executive coaching is inevitably a far more effective as part of an overall learning strategy, rather than a standalone.

Caroline Sheridan, Chair, Workplace and Employment CMC group and Founder of Sheridan Resolutions

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The power of empowerment

We’ve been really busy in recent weeks with all sorts of varied work for clients – the diversity of the challenges we face is one of the most enjoyable parts of working for Sheridan Resolutions. When you have seemingly disparate challenges to deal with, it’s natural to look for common factors causing them – and their possible resolution. Currently, I see “empowerment” running through many workplace situations, like a word running through a stick of seaside rock.

 

Mediation, for example, has long been seen as a means to promote the empowerment of its participants. But what does empowerment mean in practice? In mediation, empowerment surely means individual growth and a new feeling of confidence to find one’s voice in potentially difficult future situations. This personal development does not occur straight away, nor is it an inevitable outcome of mediation. Today, therefore, the mediator needs to think not only about the mediation in front of them, but also keep an eye to the future by creating the environment in which each individual’s growth will be actively encouraged once the present challenges are resolved.

 

In executive coaching, empowerment is all about helping individuals to bring improved levels of performance to their existing and future roles. One of my favourite quotes, from the executive coaching pioneer Sir John Whitmore, is that “Coaching [unlocks] a person’s potential to maximise their own performance. It is helping them to learn rather than teaching them.” A skilful coach helps individuals to remove or reduce internal obstacles to their performance, so that their natural ability is empowered thereafter.

Posted in: Executive Coaching, Mediation & Conflict Resolution

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How executive coaching can drive diversity

There’s an excellent lead article in this week’s Coaching & Mediation Weekly on a much under-discussed benefit of executive coaching – increased diversity.
Many organisations talk well about diversity, but far fewer deliver well. Yet executive coaching can show not just the coachees, but also organisations that employ them, exactly what individuals are capable of in the long-term. And it is immensely powerful in developing the career ambitions and potential of groups previously under-represented in senior management roles.

The ability to help coachees to stretch their imagination and increase their self-belief is so valuable – and is much needed. Current estimates suggest that women hold less than a quarter of FTSE 100 directorships, while the figures are far poorer among the ethnic minorities. Working with those from diverse backgrounds helps to give them the confidence they need to approach their careers from a new angle, with a momentum that can carry them further within a company than they may have previously thought possible.

One clear conclusion, however, from our lead article, is a diversity mind set must begin at the top – a strong commitment to an inclusive culture is an imperative if executive coaching is to flourish.

We’re also delighted this week to highlight the City HR Annual conference on November 9th –and its theme “Making the World of Work better for employees”. City HR’s mission is to provide its members with the tools, research, best practice documents and expertise to support the challenges facing their businesses, through knowledge-sharing, training and peer networking aimed at professionals at all levels and across all areas of HR.

The conference is well worth a visit – click here for more details.

Caroline Sheridan, Chair, Workplace and Employment CMC group and Founder of Sheridan Resolutions

Posted in: Executive Coaching

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